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Active shooter exercise prepares Airmen for the worst

Master Sgt. Crystal Carroll, and Master Sgt. Amanda Taylor, 926th Wing active shooter inspection team members, evaluate the wing’s response to an active shooter exercise Nov. 6, 2020, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. (U.S. Air Force photo by Natalie Stanley)

Master Sgt. Crystal Carroll and Master Sgt. Amanda Taylor, 926th Wing active shooter inspection team members, evaluate the wing’s response to an active shooter exercise Nov. 6, 2020, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. (U.S. Air Force photo by Natalie Stanley)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. --

Members of the 926th Wing were evaluated on their response to an active shooter exercise, Nov. 16, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

The exercise was the culmination of planning by the 926th Wing Inspector General team, led by Master Sgt. Elisa Gemik, 926th Wing exercise planner, to see if members knew how to respond to both hide and run options during an active shooter scenario.

“We react the way we train,” said Gemik. “If wing personnel are unaware of actions to take during an active shooter situation then our mission will ultimately fail.”

Due to COVID restrictions, this was the first opportunity the wing had to complete one of their two required active shooter exercises this year.

“We had a much better response than our exercise from last year,” said Andrew Roth, 926th Wing Emergency Management Anti-terrorism Training Office, Wing Inspection Team member. “With every exercise, there are things that we learn that allow us to improve our processes along with the training we provide our members.”

To ensure the wing is always ready, Roth regularly speaks with wing members to reiterate emergency procedures, while Gemik plans exercises that will prepare them for worst-case scenarios.

“Long-term exercise planning has an overall goal of giving our Airmen the most realistic scenario while limiting safety concerns to provide the best possible outcomes,” said Gemik.

More events are planned in the future, including a collaboration with the 99th Air Base Wing, to make sure those practicing never lose their sense of urgency and the knowledge they may need to save their lives one day.