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USAF Reserve advisers to USSF & USSPACECOM leaders visit 310th Space Wing

Photo of a woman standing outside with her arms out.

Maj. Gen. Pamela Lincoln, the mobilization assistant to the United States Space Command commander, speaks to members of the 310th Space Wing during the Unit Training Assembly, Aug. 1 2020, at Schriver Air Force Base, Colorado. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Casciotta)

A woman stand outside near two flags speaking to an audience.

Maj. Gen. Kimberly Crider, the mobilization assistant to the chief of space operations of the United States Space Force, speaks to 310th Space Wing Reservists during the Unit Training Assembly at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, August 1, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Casciotta)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

Top Air Force Reserve advisors to the U.S. Space Force and U.S. Space Command visited the 310th Space Wing during its Unit Training Assembly and shared information regarding the Space Force and what it means for the wing.

Compared to the active duty Air Force, no significant changes are on the immediate horizon for Reserve Citizen Airmen at the 310th Space Wing. However, Maj. Gen. Kimberly Crider, the mobilization assistant to the chief of space operations of the USSF, and Maj. Gen. Pamela Lincoln, mobilization assistant to the commander of USSPACECOM, spoke about the decision-making processes taking place at the Pentagon.

The Space Force is currently working with the Department of the Air Force and Department of Defense to consider options to integrate the space functions of the reserve component into the new service.

“There is still a lot of study and research that needs to be done first,” she added. “Ultimately, the decision on how to move forward will be a collaborative effort involving Congress and the Department of Defense.”

For now, there will be no transfer of reservists over to the Space Force.

The Space Force recently executed an organizational realignment, its first since its transition from the previous Air Force major command structure. The new structure is designed to remove layers of bureaucracy and help to organize, train and equip a lean, agile force.

On July 24, three Air Force space wings, the 21st Space Wing at Peterson Air Force Base; the 50th Space Wing here; and the 460th Space Wing at Buckley Air Force Base, were deactivated. In their place, the Space Force stood up eight mission deltas and two installation support garrisons.

“This is a historic time in our nation’s history and you are a crucial part of it,” said Lincoln. “You play an integral role in space operations and provide the strategic depth the total force needs.”

“Space operators will be realigned with the new space deltas,” she continued. “However, we are one team.” Addressing the other career fields she said, “You may align with other commands, but you will still be part of this wing.”

“There is no more exciting time to be part of this mission,” said Crider. “Whether you’re an Air Force Reserve member assigned to a space mission or a Space Force member, I would argue this is the most exciting place to be.”

“Every service is looking to the Space Force, and by extension, to the Reserve support to the Space Force, to ensure those critical capabilities you deliver are available to every single combatant command that needs them,” she added. “You guys are in a position of extreme importance to our nation.”