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Joint Base Charleston delivers Russia bound ventilators

Delivering Ventilators to Moscow

Brock Bierman, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), assistant administrator, watches as a C-17 Globemaster III assigned to Joint Base Charleston S.C., taxis on the flight line at March Air Reserve Base, California, where 50 USAID provided ventilators will be loaded onto the aircraft for delivery to Moscow, Russia, May 19, 2020. The COVID-19 outbreak is worsening in Russia, which has the second-highest number of recorded cases on the world and the highest number of cases in Europe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Keith James)

Delivering Ventilators to Moscow

Transportation systems technicians from the 452nd Logistic Readiness Squadron, and aircrew from the 701st Airlift Squadron use a K-loader to load 50 U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provided ventilators to be delivered to Moscow, Russia, onto a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III assigned to Joint Base Charleston S.C., at March Air Reserve Base, California, May 19, 2020. For nearly 60 years, USAID and the Department of Defense have partnered to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and promote economic growth and stability around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Keith James)

Delivering Ventilators to Moscow

Transportation systems technicians from the 452nd Logistic Readiness Squadron, palletize 50 U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provided ventilators that will be delivered to Moscow, Russia, at March Air Reserve Base, California, May 19, 2020. For nearly 60 years, USAID and the Department of Defense have partnered to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and promote economic growth and stability around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Keith James)

Delivering Ventilators to Moscow

Pallets of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provided ventilators that will be delivered to Moscow, Russia, sit onboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III assigned to Joint Base Charleston S.C., at March Air Reserve Base, California, May 19, 2020. Through the generosity of the American people and private industry innovation, the United States is providing critical medical supplies and ventilators to people in need around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Keith James)

MARCH AIR RESERVE BASE, Calif --

A Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina C-17 Globemaster III, today, picked up 50 USAID-provided ventilators at March Air Reserve Base, Calif. and delivered them to Dover Air Force Base, Maryland. The mission is the first leg of a USAID mission to deliver 200 ventilators this month to Moscow.

“The military is providing transportation to take this important equipment into Russia to help the people of Russia while they battle COVID-19,” Said Lt. Col. Susan Gordon, 701 AS pilot and aircraft commander.

“USAID is delivering ventilators to Russia because, right now, Russia is number two in the world as far as confirmed cases, and number one in Europe,” said Brock Bierman, United States Agency for International Development Assistant Administrator.

“Right now, Russia needs these ventilators to help the Russian people and to help save lives,” Bierman said. 

He said USAID’s response to COVID-19 is about helping countries all over the world.

USAID’s main mission is to create partners in the world community that ensure that we actually have partners, moving ahead, that help other people in need,” said Brock Bierman, United States Agency for International Development Assistant Administrator.

“The United States is always there to help countries – specifically when we are facing a world-wide pandemic,” Bierman added.  “There’s never been a more important time for us to come together, not just as two countries but as nations around the world.”

USAID leads the U.S. government's international development and disaster assistance through partnerships and investments that save lives, reduce poverty, strengthen democratic governance, and help people emerge from humanitarian crises and progress beyond assistance.