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Conversion to paperless records continues

Brig. Gen. W.C. Morse, left, enters the first master personnel record in the open shelf files at the Air Reserve Records Center in Denver in 1957. Fifty-two years later, Brig. Gen. Kevin E. Pottinger, right, scans one of the last Air Force Reserve unit personnel records at the Air Reserve Personnel Center. Contract employees in ARPC converted the last unit personnel record group to an electronic record Aug. 4, 2009. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Eric Valdez)

Brig. Gen. W.C. Morse, left, enters the first master personnel record in the open shelf files at the Air Reserve Records Center in Denver in 1957. Fifty-two years later, Brig. Gen. Kevin E. Pottinger, right, scans one of the last Air Force Reserve unit personnel records at the Air Reserve Personnel Center. Contract employees in ARPC converted the last unit personnel record group to an electronic record Aug. 4, 2009. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Eric Valdez)

DENVER -- The Air Reserve Personnel Center here reached an important milestone Aug. 4. It was the last day a paper copy of a unit personnel record from an Air Force Reserve unit was electronically scanned .

During the year-long conversion project, employees at the center scanned a total of 54,649 records. The conversion means traditional reservists and individual mobilization augmentees can view the documents from their unit personnel record group on the center's secure Web site.

"The advantage of this is that Airmen can see their own records online," said Master Sgt. Lina Revis, quality assurance evaluator in ARPC's directorate of records quality management. "Even if members are deployed, they have access to their records."

Scanning records electronically is a major step in the Air Force's Personnel Service Delivery Transformation and e-Records initiative, which will transition personnel records from paper to electronic.

The records in the unit personnel record group are an Airman's history of personnel information, including awards and decorations, officer and enlisted performance reports, Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance forms and education information. Air Force Reserve units from 39 bases throughout the Air Force sent their records to ARPC.

Although the conversion of the unit personnel record group for traditional reservists and IMAs is complete, the work at ARPC continues.

The next phase of record scans at ARPC could include more than 100,000 records of individuals who have separated or retired or who belong to the Individual Ready Reserve.

"It's pretty significant," said Jackie Bing, director of ARPC's records quality management. "The electronic record is the goal. It's the future. ARPC is doing our part to address that goal."  (Air Force Reserve Command News Service)