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C-5M Super Galaxy officially sets 41 world records

Master Sgt. Richard Biasi, 512th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, marshals a C-5M Super Galaxy moments before a historical take off. A Team Dover aircrew onboard "The Spirit of Normandy," unofficially set 41 records in a single flight Sept. 13. The certified results are expected to be released in about a month. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

Master Sgt. Richard Biasi, 512th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, marshals a C-5M Super Galaxy moments before a historical take off. A Team Dover aircrew onboard "The Spirit of Normandy," officiall set 41 world records in a single flight Sept. 13. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

A Team Dover aircrew onboard a C-5M Super Galaxy, "The Spirit of Normandy," unofficially set 41 records in a single flight Sept. 13. The certified results are expected to be released in about a month. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

A Team Dover aircrew onboard a C-5M Super Galaxy, "The Spirit of Normandy" officially set 41 world ecords in a single flight Sept. 13. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

A Dover C-5M Super Galaxy went into the record books Jan. 19 when the F?d?ration A?ronautique Internationale certified 41 world records set by a Sept. 13, 2009, flight. Pictured here are the Team Dover Airmen who flew the record-breaking flight. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

A Dover C-5M Super Galaxy went into the record books Jan. 19 when the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale certified 41 world records set by a Sept. 13, 2009, flight. Pictured here are the Team Dover Airmen who flew the record-breaking flight. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jason Minto)

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. -- A Dover C-5M Super Galaxy went into the world record books Jan. 19 when the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale certified 41 records set during a Sept. 13, 2009, flight.

The U.S. National Aeronautic Association approved the U.S. records Oct. 30 before submitting them to the FAI, a Swiss-based world air-sports organization with more than 100 member countries, for certification as world records.

A NAA official was onboard and documented the world record attempts, which included various altitude, payload and time-to-climb rates. For example, with a payload of 80,000 kg (about 176,000 pounds), the C-5M climbed to 12,469 meters. The records "trickled down" to lighter payloads and lower altitudes. On board was the "greatest payload" with 80,036 kg of cargo.

"It was great to be a part of this flight because we were able to showcase the capability and efficiency of the C-5M while demonstrating how Team Dover works together every day to accomplish the mission," said Maj. Cory Bulris, 9th Airlift Squadron C-5M aircraft commander. "In the process of setting these records, the crew was able to demonstrate the new aircraft's ability to escape the threat environment quickly and effectively."

The C-5 heavy-transport aircraft has been part of the Air Force inventory for four decades. With the new Reliability Enhancement and Re-engining Program, or RERP, the aircraft is forecast to be in service another 40 years. RERP outfits the aircraft with new, quieter, more powerful and fuel-efficient engines and 70 other enhancements. RERP is the second part of a two-phase upgrade that also includes the Avionics Modernization Program.

Since attempting the world record flight, Dover's three C-5M aircraft have completed the operational testing and evaluation phase and recently returned from the first C-5M mission to Iraq.

"We've tested the ability to fly this aircraft directly to the Middle East with 33 direct flights to Incirlik, Turkey and returning direct to Dover" said Lt. Col. Mike Semo, 709th Airlift Squadron pilot and C-5M Program Office chief. "Now that it's been tested and proven, the only requirement is the final approval to be able to accomplish direct flights. This will allow us to develop a wider range of strategic abilities around the C-5M aircraft and will significantly decrease the time the aircraft spends on the ground. In some cases, this will save us over a day in travel time."