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  • Innovative Strikers aid Command's ability to accelerate change

    Striker Airmen pitched innovative ideas to Air Force Global Strike Command and civilian leadership
  • Trailblazer talks innovation, diversity, recruitment

    The 14th Flying Training Wing hosted U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Jeannie Leavitt, Department of the Air Force chief of safety, Headquaters U.S. Air Force Arlington, VA, and the Air Force Safety Center commander, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM., Oct. 13, 2021, on Columbus Air Force Base, Miss., during her visit as a distinguished guest for a Mississippi State University, USAF Detachment 425 formal evening event.
  • Spangdahlem refuels BTF bombers with VIPER kit for first time

    Spangdahlem AB employed the VIPER kit by refueling B-1s participating in Bomber Task Force - Europe 22-1, following NATO allied integration during an operation in the Baltic Region. This marks the first time the refueling system was used outside of F-16 Fighting Falcons in the U.S. Air Forces in Europe–Air Forces Africa theatre.
  • Tech Training Transformation introduces MOTAR

    Once again, the Analysis and Innovation Directorate’s Det 23 has accelerated change in the education and training landscape. This time, their Tech Training Transformation (T3) team is strengthening the entire Air Force with an Air Education and Training Command digital platform that will deliver, analyze and report all training, making our force more ready, and certainly more lethal. The best part? T3 hit this milestone in partnership with an American small business.
  • AFMC Spark Tank finalists announced

    Air Force Materiel Command named its 2022 MAJCOM Spark Tank finalists during the command Senior Leader Conference, Oct. 8. Spark Tank brings forth the innovative knowledge and powers of Airmen and Guardians, reflecting leadership’s continued efforts to empower and provide them with a platform to pitch innovative solutions to operational problems.
  • Air Force and university scientists share their vision for unconventional computing

    Conventional computing hardware represents information as ones and zeros, depending on the state of electronic transistors. This creates artificial bottlenecks in the flow of information processing by first requiring that environmental loads be converted into an electronic state and second by routing the information to centralized computers for processing. Researchers from Wright-Patterson’s Air Force Research Lab, along with collaborators from the University of Pennsylvania, University of York and Northwestern University, argue in a recently published Nature perspective paper that new and unconventional ways of representing information in materials could be the key to removing these bottlenecks and redistributing this computing burden.
  • AFIT student wins Innovations in Nuclear Technology R&D Award

    First Lt. Ashwin Rao, a nuclear engineering doctoral student within the Air Force Institute of Technology’s Graduate School of Engineering and Management, recently received the Innovations in Nuclear Technology R&D Award sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Fuel and Supply Chain.
  • Web-based enrollment streamlines visitor pass process

    A new web-based enrollment system now deployed at several Air Force installations is streamlining the visitor pass process and reducing foot traffic at visitor control centers.
  • Airmen use VR during suicide prevention training

    In an effort to combat the increasing suicide rates across the Air Force, the 6th Air Refueling Wing Integrated Resilience Team incorporated new technology and training methods, providing Airmen with access to a virtual reality suicide prevention system on Sept. 29, 2021.
  • Kadena Maintainers Manufacture The Future

    The process began with maintainers from the 353rd Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron requiring an HF Antenna Clamp Block Assembly. However, the part materials are costly, and it could cost the Air Force upwards of thousands of dollars and several years to obtain the part through conventional methods. Faced with potentially costly obstacles to their mission, Airmen from the Communication and Navigation Unit within the 353rd SOAMXS went above and beyond with one thought: Why not make the part themselves?
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