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A semi truck driver returns to his truck to receive humanitarian supplies at Seguin Auxiliary Airfield in support of the Hurricane Harvey relief efforts, Sept. 1, 2017. Hurricane Harvey formed in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall in southeastern Texas, bringing record flooding and destruction to the region. U.S. military assets supported FEMA as well as state and local authorities in rescue and relief efforts.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Larry E. Reid Jr., Released) Hurricanes, wildfires keep AF Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers busy in 2017
With massive category 5 hurricanes slamming the Gulf Coast, East Coast, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands, and wildfires raging in the West, these Reserve Citizen Airmen Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers were called on 197 times to support real-world disasters, National Special Security Events and Special Event Assessment Rating Events
0 2/08
2018
A Defense Logistics Agency forklift operator prepares to pallet of MREs at JBSA Randolph Auxiliary Airfield, Seguin, Texas, Sept. 5, 2017. Three Chinooks loaded 20 pallets of MREs to to transport as part of the relief efforts for Hurricane Harvey. The category-4 hurricane, with wind speeds up to 130 miles per hour, made landfall Aug. 25, 2017. Days after the hurricane reached Texas, more than 50 inches of rain flooded the coastal region. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Chad Chisholm/Released) Individual Reservists lend a hand after Harvey
In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, which flooded the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana with more than 50 inches of rain, Air Force Reserve Individual Mobilization Augmentees were on the ground helping with recovery efforts.Many of these Reserve Citizen Airmen contributed in uniform, as emergency preparedness liaison officers, chaplains and judge
0 9/06
2017
Airmen help one another with response and recovery efforts Aug. 19 after flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather Heiney) Airmen help one another after Louisiana flooding
“The water started seeping in through the walls. We woke up our son, put on his little boots, and put him up on the table.” Callie Lips, children’s book illustrator, her husband Tech. Sgt. Ricky Lips, 403rd Maintenance Squadron, and their two-year-old son were one of the 403rd Wing families affected by the flash floods that swept through Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Aug. 12. Tech. Sgt. Lips said that all the roads were closed, so they sheltered across the street with their friends who have a generator. When the power eventually came back on, they went home and went to sleep. They said something woke them up around 5 a.m. and they saw that the water outside was starting to rise, but they let their son sleep until it started seeping in through the walls.
0 8/22
2016
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