AF Reserve News

Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. John Raven, assigned to 1st Combat Camera Squadron, climbs over a high bar during the obstacle course portion of the 2018 SPC Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 1, 2018.The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it’s hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Lundborg, assigned to 4th Combat Camera Squadron, climbs a rope during the obstacle course portion of the 2018 SPC Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 1, 2018.The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it’s hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Keifer Bowes (left) and Airman 1st Class Matthew Zakrzewski, both assigned to 1st Combat Camera Squadron, run during the 10-mile road march part of the 2018 SPC Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 3, 2018. The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it's hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Franklin Harris (left) and Senior Airman Maygan Straight, both assigned to 1st Combat Camera Squadron, conduct the 10-mile road march part of the 2018 SPC Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 3, 2018. The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it's hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Maygan Straight (top), and Airman 1st Class Franklin Harris, both assigned to 1st Combat Camera Squadron, treat a simulated casualty during the Urban Warfare Simulation lane of the 2018 Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 2, 2018. The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it’s hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Charleston Combat Camera teams take first, third in DoD competition
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Maygan Straight, assigned to 1st Combat Camera Squadron, collects Sensitive Site Exploitation imagery during the Urban Warfare Simulation lane of the 2018 Hilda I. Clayton Best Combat Camera Competition, Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, May 2, 2018. The competition is an annual event open to all branches of the military, it’s hosted by the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera) in order to test the technical and tactical proficiencies of Department of Defense combat photographers. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Pablo N. Piedra)
Reserve Recruiting Service rolls out mobile marketing platform
Tech Sgt Jose Neri, a recruiter with Team March, works the pull up bar area of the new mobile marketing platform at the March Air Reserve Base Air and Space Expo.The MMP is an interactive a marketing tool that will increase awareness and audience engagement, generate leads, and educate influencers about the Air Force Reserve. (Air Force photo/Master Sgt Chance Babin)
Reserve Recruiting Service rolls out mobile marketing platform
A look at the new Air Force Reserve mobile marketing platform. The MMP is a marketing tool that will increase awareness and audience engagement, generate leads, and educate influencers about the Air Force Reserve. The MMP is equipped with large high definition touchscreen that feature interactive quizzes and games, and a photo booth for attendees to take photos against pre-loaded Air Force Reserve branded backdrops. It also features a pull-up bar for those looking for something more physical. A unique feature on the MMP is a charging station. (Air Force photo/Master Sgt Chance Babin)
AFRC Recruiting Service rolls out mobile marketing platform
Master Sgt Chuck Wandzilak, a recruiter at Team March, assists a air show guest with sending his photo to himsself as part of the Air Force Reserve photo booth, which is part of the new Air Force Reserve mobile marketing platform at the March Air Reserve Base Air and Space Expo. The MMP is an interactive a marketing tool that will increase awareness and audience engagement, generate leads, and educate influencers about the Air Force Reserve. (Air Force photo/Master Sgt Chance Babin)
AFRC Recruiting Service rolls out mobile marketing platform
Master Sgt Marcus Hearns, a recruiter at Team March, talks to an air show attendee at the charging station of the new Air Force Reserve mobile marketing platform at the March Air Reserve Base Air and Space Expo. The MMP is an interactive a marketing tool that will increase awareness and audience engagement, generate leads, and educate influencers about the Air Force Reserve. (Air Force photo/Master Sgt Chance Babin)

Robotic surgery training program aims at improving patient outcomes

Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Miss., June 16, 2017. The training program was stood up in March, 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue).

Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Miss., June 16, 2017. The training program was stood up in March 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AFNS) -- As the use of surgical robotics increases, the Air Force Medical Service is training its surgical teams in the latest technology, ensuring patients have access to the most advanced surgical procedures and best possible outcomes.
To address the demand for training military healthcare providers, Maj. Joshua Tyler, director of robotics at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, helped to establish the Institute for Defense Robotic Surgical Education. The first of its kind in the Air Force, the facility trains Air Force, Army, Navy and Department of Veterans Affairs surgical teams to use state-of-the-art medical robotics. Access to this type of training was previously only available through private industry.

“Robotic surgery is becoming the standard of care for many specialties and procedures, but Air Force surgeons had limited opportunities to train with surgical robots,” said Tyler. “We needed a way to get surgeons trained without relying solely on the private sector. With the creation of InDoRSE we are able to do just that by using existing facilities and personnel.”

The InDoRSE training site addresses challenges unique to military healthcare. The training also uses a team-based model, which helps overcome some of the challenges of implementing robotic surgery in military hospitals.

“Between deployments, operational tempo, and varying surgical volumes at military facilities, it is important that whole teams are fully trained on surgical robotics,” explained Tyler. “Also training the nurses and medical technicians, in addition to the surgeon, ensures that everyone has tangible experience with the robot, and helps get surgical robotics up and running much quicker.”

Robotic surgeries have been shown to deliver better outcomes for patients than traditional surgery. Robotics offers increased mobility for the surgeon, allowing them to make smaller incisions, and gives them better visualization. This precision leads to more successful surgeries and quicker recovery times, which improves patient satisfaction and lowers costs.

“The best outcomes I’ve ever given my patients came using robotics,” explained Tyler. “We see significant decreases in post-surgery pain, surgical site infection rates and length of hospital stay. That quicker recovery means patients get to return to their normal life more quickly.”

The InDoRSE facility at Keesler AFB stood up in March 2017. There are already plans to double its training capacity soon. Soon after Keesler AFB’s facility opened, Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio set up their own surgical robotics program. Travis AFB in California and Nellis AFB in Nevada are currently working on their surgical robotics acquisition now.

“Use of robotics is increasing in many medical specialties,” said Tyler. “Providing opportunities for our whole surgical teams to receive training on this cutting edge technology is vital to the AFMS’s focus on continuously improving the patient experience.”