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Medal of Honor recipient visits Patrick AFB

Medal of Honor recipient retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris coined Maj. Marcus Smith, 308th Rescue Squadron, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., Jan. 31, 2017. During a visit to PAFB, Morris gave a presentation emphasizing the importance of pushing through adversity because "we are trained and trusted to always get the job done regardless of our circumstances." (Courtesy photo)

Medal of Honor recipient retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris coined Maj. Marcus Smith, 308th Rescue Squadron, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., Jan. 31, 2017. During a visit to PAFB, Morris gave a presentation emphasizing the importance of pushing through adversity because "we are trained and trusted to always get the job done regardless of our circumstances." (Courtesy photo)

Retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris, Medal of Honor recipient, wears his 55-year old Green Beret, Jan. 31, 2017, at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.  Morris’s Green Beret has never left his side since the day President John F. Kennedy visited Fort Bragg and authorized U.S. Army Special Forces to wear Green Berets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Phil Sunkel)

Retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris, Medal of Honor recipient, wears his 55-year old Green Beret, Jan. 31, 2017, at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Morris’s Green Beret has never left his side since the day President John F. Kennedy visited Fort Bragg and authorized U.S. Army Special Forces to wear Green Berets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Phil Sunkel)

Medal of Honor recipient retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris speaks to members of Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Jan. 31, 2017. Morris emphasized the importance of pushing through adversity because we are trained and trusted to always get the job done regardless of our circumstances. (U.S. Air Force photo by Phil Sunkel)

Medal of Honor recipient retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris speaks to members of Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Jan. 31, 2017. Morris emphasized the importance of pushing through adversity because we are trained and trusted to always get the job done regardless of our circumstances. (U.S. Air Force photo by Phil Sunkel)

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

It's not everyday you get to meet someone who's been featured on a postage stamp.

On Jan. 31, 2017, personnel from Patrick Air Force Base gathered to hear from a special visitor whose likeness was placed on the top right-hand corner of millions of envelopes sent through the U.S. postal system, Medal of Honor recipient retired U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris.

In his presentation he emphasized the importance of pushing through adversity. "Because we are trained and trusted to always get the job done regardless of our circumstances," he said.

Afterward, Morris interacted with the audience. Among them, Air Force Reserve rescue warrior Maj. Marcus Smith, 308th Rescue Squadron Logistics Officer, at which time Morris presented Smith with one of his congressional MOH Society coins without any explanation as to why. Smith said he was moved by the gift and Morris's inspirational stories.

Morris was honored on a postage stamp sheet released on Memorial Day in 2015. Morris, 75, of Port St. John, is among 48 living recipients of the Medal of Honor that was depicted on the stamp sheets.

The retired Army sergeant first class received the nation's highest military honor for his heroics during his service as a green beret in the Vietnam War, 45 years after his actions.

In September 1969, Morris, then a 27-year-old staff sergeant, led an advance across enemy lines near Chi Lang, Vietnam, to retrieve a fallen comrade and keep sensitive documents from falling in enemy hands.

He single-handedly destroyed an enemy force that had pinned his battalion from a series of bunkers, according to the Army. He was shot three times, including once in the chest, but did not stop until he reached relative safety with the American casualty.

In March 2014 President Barrack Obama awarded him the Medal of Honor.

Editor's note: Some information from this article came from a 45th Space Wing news article.